Proven efficacy of Aleve®: strength and duration vs acetaminophen plus codeine

Two 8-hour studies (N=455) compared 1 dose of Aleve® 440 mg with 1 dose of acetaminophen 600 mg plus codeine 60 mg after surgical removal of 3 or 4 molars (≥1 impacted). From the 3-hour mark onward in both studies, patients who took Aleve® reported significantly reduced pain compared with those taking APAP+codeine (P<0.05).1 The 12-hour strength of Aleve® also gave patients more sustained pain relief per dose, as demonstrated by a longer median time to remedication, versus patients on APAP+codeine (P<0.05), which is commonly prescribed every 4 hours as needed.1,2

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IN A CLINICAL STUDY

Proven efficacy of Aleve®: strength and duration vs acetaminophen

A controlled, single-dose, randomized, double-blind, 12 hour clinical trial compared efficacy and duration of action of 440 mg Aleve® (n=92), 1000 mg acetaminophen (n=89), and placebo (n=45) patients with at least moderate pain after extraction of 3 or 4 third molars.3 The study demonstrated that mean pain relief with Aleve® was significantly superior to both placebo and acetaminophen at hours 4 to 12 after initial dosing (P<0.05).3

In the trial, patients taking acetaminophen required remedication as soon as 3 hours later, and there was no significant difference in pain relief between acetaminophen and placebo at 6 hours.3

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Higher patient ratings of pain relief seen with Aleve® than with acetaminophen

In a trial in dental pain, 3 times more patients reported the overall effectiveness of Aleve® as very good or excellent versus acetaminophen. A greater percentage of patients rated acetaminophen as good or fair versus Aleve®.1

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IN A CLINICAL STUDY

Proven duration of Aleve® vs ibuprofen

A single-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study demonstrated that the duration of pain relief after a single dose of Aleve® 440 mg was significantly longer than ibuprofen 400 mg in postsurgical dental pain. Significantly fewer Aleve®-treated subjects required rescue medication over a 24-hour period.4

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Professional guidelines recommend NSAIDs as first-line minor pain treatment

In response to the increase in prescription opioid abuse, dental associations recommend NSAIDs as first line therapy.5-7 The American Dental Association recommends NSAIDs as first-line therapy for acute pain management,5,6 and the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons recommends NSAIDs as a first-line analgesic therapy for pain management.7 Aleve® is indicated for the temporary relief of minor aches and pains.8

References: 1. Data on file, Bayer Consumer Health. 2. TYLENOL® with codeine Medication Guide. Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc.; October 2019. 3. Kiersch TA, Halladay SC, Hormel PC. A single-dose, double-blind comparison of naproxen sodium, acetaminophen, and placebo in postoperative dental pain. Clin Ther. 1994;16(3):394-404. 4. Cooper SA, Desjardins P, Brain P, et al. Longer analgesic effect with naproxen sodium than ibuprofen in post-surgical dental pain: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-dose trial. Curr Med Res Opin. 2019;35(12):2149-2158. doi:10.1080/03007995.2019.1655257 5. American Dental Association announces new policy to combat opioid epidemic. News release. American Dental Association. March 26, 2018. Accessed July 28, 2021. https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/american-dental-association-announces-new-policy-to-combat-opioid-epidemic-300618928.html 6. American Dental Association. Statement on the use of opioids in the treatment of dental pain. October 2016. Accessed October 14, 2021. https://www.ada.org/en/advocacy/current-policies 7. American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Opioid prescribing: acute and postoperative pain management; 2020. White Paper. Accessed July 28, 2021. https://www.aaoms.org/docs/govt_affairs/advocacy_white_papers/opioid_prescribing.pdf 8. Aleve® Caplets. Drug facts. Bayer HealthCare; April 2018.